Revisit one of the exercises on daylight, artificial light or controlled light from Part Four (Ex 4.1, Ex 4.2 or Ex 4.3) and develop it into a formal assignment submission. The submission requirement for this assignment is a set of between six and ten high-quality photographic prints.

There are many ways to edit and the most valuable one is probably to show your work to friends, family and your OCA peers for feedback – you are guaranteed to discover something new in your work. Another tip is to pin the work up on the wall and live with a for a fewContinue reading “Revisit one of the exercises on daylight, artificial light or controlled light from Part Four (Ex 4.1, Ex 4.2 or Ex 4.3) and develop it into a formal assignment submission. The submission requirement for this assignment is a set of between six and ten high-quality photographic prints.”

Exercise 4.4: Personal Voice

Make a Google Images search for ‘landscape’, ‘portrait’, or any ordinary subject such as ‘apple’ or ‘sunset’. Add a screengrab of a representative page to your learning log and note down the similarities you find between the images. Now take a number of your own photographs of the same subject, paying special attention to the ‘Creativity’ criteria atContinue reading “Exercise 4.4: Personal Voice”

Exercise 4.3: Egg or stone

Use a combination of quality, contrast, direction and colour to light an object in order to reveal its form. For this exercise, we recommend that you choose a natural or organic object such as an egg or stone rather than a man-made object. Man-made or cultural artefactscan be fascinating to light but they’re already authoredContinue reading “Exercise 4.3: Egg or stone”

Exercise 4.2: Artificial Light

Capture ‘the beauty of artificial light’ in a short sequence of shots (‘beauty’ is, of course, a subjective term). The correct white balance setting will be important; this can get tricky – but interesting – if there are mixed light sources of different colour temperatures in the same shot. You can shoot indoors or outsideContinue reading “Exercise 4.2: Artificial Light”

Exercise 4.1: Daylight

Taking the photography of Mann, Atget or Schmidt or a photographer of your own choosing as your starting point, shoot a number of photographs exploring the quality of natural light. The exercise should be done in manual mode and the important thing is to observe the light, not just photograph it. In your learning log, andContinue reading “Exercise 4.1: Daylight”

Assignment three The (in)decisive moment

‘The decisive moment is not a dramatic climax but a visual one: the result is not a story but a picture.’ (Swarkowski, 2007, p.5) ‘You know it’s funny. You come to someplace new, and everything looks just the same.’ (Eddie in Stranger Than Paradise, Dir. Jim Jarmusch, 1984) Brief Create a set of between six andContinue reading “Assignment three The (in)decisive moment”

Exercise 3.3: WHAT MATTERS IS TO LOOK

‘If you are not willing to see more than is visible, you won’t see anything’ Ruth Bernhard (1902-2006) Alberto Giacometti had already mastered the art of drawing when he discovered the problem of seeing both the whole figure and the detail simultaneously. When he concentrated on the whole, the details disappeared and conversely, the wholeContinue reading “Exercise 3.3: WHAT MATTERS IS TO LOOK”

Exercise 3.2: Trace

Start by doing your own research into some of the artists discussed above. Then, using slow shutter speeds, the multiple exposure function, or another technique inspired bythe examples above, try to record the trace of movement within the frame. You can be as experimental as you like. Add a selection of shots together with relevantContinue reading “Exercise 3.2: Trace”

Exercise 2: “VIEW”

‘Fragments of a vessel which are to be glued together must match one another in the smallest details although they need not be like one another.’  (Walter Benjamin, [1936] 1999, p.79)  The Walter Benjamin quote above expresses the idea that a collection should reflect a single coherent idea, but you’ll also need technical rigour toContinue reading “Exercise 2: “VIEW””